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Welcome to the StarPoint Employment Screening Blog. This blog is dedicated to sharing valuable and helpful info with employers and human resource managers about pre-employment screening, state laws, useful forms and more.

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How to Conduct Pre-employment Screening

Screening employment applicants is a crucial step in maintaining a strong and reputable work force.  Pre-employment screening can include background checks, previous employment verification, credit checks, ID Verification, and driving records.  StarPoint Employment Screening is your one stop shop for all of these reports.

It can be expensive to hire a new employee so make sure the screening is done properly.  Follow this easy to use flowchart as guidance along the way. Always seek legal advice or counsel when denying an applicant employment.  Check with your state and local laws in regards to written denial letters and the amount of time you should give the applicant to dispute information on the screening reports.

  • This document should not be construed as legal advice.  Check with the FCRA and your applicable state laws.
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Manage Driver Risk of Your Employees by Monitoring their Driving Record

Employers and corporations should check the driving history of their employees annually or semi-annually. This is particularly true for employers and corporations who hire employees that will be driving on behalf of the company. Below are a few of the reasons that support the need for checking driving records more frequently.

The Litigious Nature of Society

Over the past ten years, society has continued to become more litigious in nature. Corporations spend millions of dollars each year disposing of lawsuits. Employers who don’t frequently check the driving record of their employees may expose themselves to additional liability. Consider the following example. A corporation hires an employee to deliver goods in a specified area. The employee has a clean driving record upon being hired, however they are subsequently involved in a couple of accidents resulting from driving while intoxicated. If that employee were to be involved in an accident while driving for the company resulting from intoxication, the company’s liability could increase considerably. However, an annual or semi-annual monitoring of the employee’s motor vehicle record could help to prevent that type of scenario from occurring.

Safety is Paramount

Driving is one of the most dangerous activities that an employee can engage in. Regular motor vehicle record (MVR) monitoring can help employers to identify employees who may pose a risk to the company’s equipment and the safety at large. MVR monitoring of an employee’s driving record can help to identify these risks through motor vehicle reports much more effectively than simply using pre-employment screening alone.

Positive Company Culture

Corporations who employ responsible strategies, such as monitoring the motor vehicle record of their employees can create a culture of accountability. Corporations can have a considerable influence on the lives of their employees, encouraging each of them to lead responsible lives both at work and off-the-clock. Choosing to utilize these types of tools can help enhance the reputation of any business or corporation. It sends a message to the public at large that the corporation cares about the safety of its employees and those in the community.

Providing a Supportive Environment

Regular monitoring of each employee’s motor vehicle report could help to identify those employees who have an exceptional driving record. This would provide a company with an opportunity to provide incentives to employees who consistently display an unmatched driving record. In addition, monitoring employees’ driving records could also help a corporation to identify employees who are experiencing some challenges that could affect their work performance in other areas. This would enable these employers to help address these issues effectively to ensure maximum efficiency.

Important Implementation Considerations

Before implementing a new program designed to frequently check the motor vehicle records of employees, it is important to disclose this information. Companies that have employee handbooks should update their handbooks to include this information. In addition, companies should also consider informing each employee through an information sheet and requesting that each employee sign an acknowledgement form agreeing to the new procedures. Finally, corporations with an office dedicated to human resources should include their HR office in the implementation process.

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Reduce Retail Theft by Pre-Employment Screening

For every retail position filled, there is retail theft happening. Sometimes these individuals are desperate, sometimes they just do it for fun. But it happens often. On the bright side, there are ways to not only detect theft, but even better, there are ways to prevent it from ever happening in your business. The most effective method is pre-employment screening. This process starts with job applicant screening, and weeding out obvious rejections.

Once you have your prospective candidates, ask them to fill out a permission form to do an employee background check and a pre-employment credit check. Any candidate who refuses to give permission should not be hired, because chances are high that their background and/or credit checks would come back with something unpleasant on them. Those who refuse generally have something to hide. Once the candidate gives permission, run the checks. When the results come back, the first thing you want to look for is anything on the background check. Any previously commited crime is a potential hazard in your workplace. A clean check is a good check.

Next, look at the credit report. A high percentage of individuals are in debt, or have had bad luck with credit cards while young. This is acceptable. However, if your candidate appears to have multiple or repeat offenses with credit cards, not making bills, or is in debt substantially, this could be a red flag. Those with very bad credit or with very high debt can get desperate for anything that will help them financially, including theft and embezelment.

Some smaller hits on a background check or credit check can be overlooked due to youth, inexperience, or mistakes. These things consist of a credit card offer at a young age, a first bank account gone awry, or a misguided idea on what checks actually are. This last can actually bring on a criminal charge of check fraud if taken too far, and will show both on the credit report and the background check. If the applicant is young, or if the offense shows as being rather old, discuss the situation with the applicant, and allow them to state a defense. If the applicant is older, and the charge new, or a repeat offense, that shows the applicant knows they are doing wrong, and just won’t stop. This is not a person you want working in your business.

To recap, when looking for prospective employees, first screen your applications, weeding out the obvious bad choices. For what you have left, do your interviews, and narrow it to 2 or 3. Ask each of these to fill out a background check permission form and a credit check permission form. Once you have the results, screen them for obvious red flags, and then look closer for smaller offenses that could be red flags to the experienced eye. Of 3 prospects, at least one will most likely be a bad choice. Of the remaining, if both have clean checks, just go with your gut instincts.

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Screen to Reduce Workplace Violence

A Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) workplace violence survey found that more than 50 percent of the respondents were concerned that workplace violence might occur at their organization. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an average of 564 work-related homicides occurred each year in the United States from 2004 to 2008. While maintaining a safe workplace is the primary goal of any workplace safety program, many companies, small and large, fail to engage in a comprehensive background screening program for employees and contractors. Why is background screening so important in screening out potential work-related violence? And, why should current employees and contractors be screened annually?

Background Screening

Workplace violence prevention can include many strategies and tactics. Developing and implementing a workplace violence prevention plan is essential. Ongoing reviews, training and drills are needed to ensure that the plan lives and is effective. Procedures and hotlines can be established for employees who need assistance and for those who recognize the warning signs of workplace violence from a co-worker. Many organizations institute highly effective awareness campaigns that include workplace speakers and seminars. Workplace violence is considered when developing security policies and access control methods.

While all of these are highly recommended, another critical strategy is to review what is at the center of every workplace violence situation—employees. Companies that care about the environment in which people are working must strive to ensure that everyone who interacts with the workforce has a violence-free history. The best prognosticator of future violence is a review of the past.

Background checks can identify applicants and employees who have demonstrated unacceptable workplace behavior. The background check process can include county criminal record and national criminal file searches, drug testing, prior employment and education verification, license verifications, and other investigations that can reveal potential warning signs. However, conviction information can be used only if certain conditions are met, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). The EEOC permits employers to use convictions on the basis of business necessity that can be justified if the conduct that led to the conviction is particularly egregious or related to the position in question.

When people know that a company stands behind comprehensive background screening, they know that the company cares about their welfare. Applicants who have dubious backgrounds that include reckless acts might “self-select” out of the interviewing process. Applicants and existing employees with clean backgrounds typically are not bothered by the screening process as they appreciate the organization’s commitment to a safe workplace.

Know Who Is on Your Premises

To secure a facility fully, the employer must know exactly who is on their premises. Whether you are a property manager, HR representative or business leader, it is important to understand that a secure workplace means screening not just employees but also contractors, vendors and temporary staff. These individuals can run the gamut from regular faces your employees know well to the contractor who visits only once. Regardless of your level of familiarity with these vendors or temporary employees, the need for thorough background screening is the same. To promote a greater level of safety and security for employees and customers, it is vital to conduct regular screening of the extended workforce, which might include service and repair professionals, construction workers, food service workers—virtually any nonemployee that is interacting with your personnel and customers.

Companies are looking for speed in the hiring and onboarding process. Comprehensive background screening can take up to a week to complete, which can exasperate some hiring managers. However, a company that fails to screen applicants rigorously or repeat screening for current employees and contractors might face much larger issues than a few days delay in onboarding a new hire. Workplace violence, employee theft, fraud and a host of other issues can arise when hiring an employee who has not been screened properly. This might make an organization vulnerable to employee injury or death, unsafe working conditions, brand and reputation damage, and lawsuits for negligent hiring.

Ongoing Screening

Additionally, it is critical to re-screen employees and contractors each year. Employees who keep their personal lives under wraps might be involved in activities that could impact the workplace. For example, an employee who joined the company with a clean record five years ago might have been involved in domestic disputes over the past few years. This information is crucial for an employer, as domestic disputes sometimes travel into the workplace. The same applies for contractors.

Violence-Free Culture

Requiring employees and contractors to complete initial and annual background screening is a common practice. Employees appreciate dedication to creating a corporate culture and working environment that is focused on safety and security.

Background screening can become the marker for when employees and contractors should be reminded of other elements of your workplace violence prevention efforts. Information to promote awareness and reminders to participate in company-sponsored training can be distributed when background checks are initiated.

There are many stressors in the workplace today. Employees and contractors are juggling large workloads, demanding deadlines and a rocky economy. People want to know that the colleagues they pass in the hall, the contractor who fixes their copier, and the cleaning crew who tidies up their workspace are vetted by their employer as best as is possible legally. Background screening might not weed out every potential workplace violence situation, but it is the gold standard of what companies can and must do.

William (Bill) J. Tate is president of HRPlus, www.HRPlus.com, a leading provider of comprehensive employment and background-screening solutions and a division of AlliedBarton Security Services, the industry’s provider of highly trained security personnel. Bill Tate can be reached at WTate@hrplus.com.

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What Employers Must Know About The Fair Credit Reporting Act

Every employer must take the time to review and understand the complicated requirements of the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA), 15 U.S.C. §§1681-1681u, et seq., when obtaining consumer reports and/or making employment decisions based on those reports. The FCRA requirements place substantial burdens on employers using consumer reporting agencies to perform credit and background checks of new and current employees.

When Does the FCRA Apply to an Employer?

When an employer obtains background information on an individual from a third party to make employment-related decisions, it must comply with the FCRA if the background information is either a “consumer report” or an “investigative consumer report” and the third party is a “consumer reporting agency.”

A “consumer report” is defined as any communication that contains information about an individual’s creditworthiness, credit standing, credit capacity, character, general reputation, personal characteristics or mode of living. Although the FCRA does not give specific examples, some examples may include criminal background reports; workers’ compensation history and medical reports; motor vehicle reports; reference checks; verification of education, license or past employment; credit history reports; and general background reports.

An “investigative consumer report” is defined as any communication containing information about an individual’s character, general reputation, personal characteristics or mode of living that is obtained through personal interviews with neighbors, friends or associates of the individual. If a consumer report contains this type of information and the information is obtained through personal interviews with others, that portion of the consumer report is treated as an investigative consumer report.

A “consumer reporting agency” is defined as any person or entity who regularly engages in the practice of assembling or evaluating information on individuals for the purpose of providing reports to third parties. According to this definition, the FCRA does not apply to an employer that conducts reference checks for itself. Thus, the FCRA is not implicated when the employer conducts, for its own use, reference checks with prior employers of an applicant or employee.

When May an Employer Obtain A Report Under the FCRA?

The FCRA authorizes a consumer reporting agency to furnish reports for a limited number of permissible purposes. The FCRA also prohibits a person from obtaining or using a report for any purpose not authorized by the FCRA.

Relevant to an employer, a consumer reporting agency may furnish a report if it is:

·         In response to a court order or federal grand jury subpoena;

·         In accordance with the written instructions of the individual to whom it relates; or

·         Provided to a person who intends to use the information for employment purposes.

Thus, an employer may order and use reports obtained from a consumer reporting agency to make employment-related decisions, such as hiring, promotion, reassignment or retention of an employee.

What Information Must Be Excluded from a Report?

An employer also should be aware that the FCRA imposes certain restrictions on the content of a consumer report or investigative consumer report. The following information may not be included or requested in a report:

·         Bankruptcies that are more than 10 years old.

·         Lawsuits and judgments that are more than seven years old.

·         Paid tax liens that are more than seven years old.

·         Accounts placed for collection or charged to profit and loss that are more than seven years old.

·         Records of arrest.

·         Any other adverse information that is more than seven years old at the time the report is made.

What Are the FCRA’s Procedural Requirements?

An employer that orders and uses a consumer report or investigative consumer report from a consumer reporting agency for employment purposes must comply with various procedural requirements. These requirements consist primarily of notice and disclosure to the individual and certification of compliance with the FCRA to the consumer reporting agency.

The procedural requirements for obtaining and using a consumer report and investigative consumer report are very similar but not identical. Because information provided in an investigative consumer report is obtained through personal interviews with associates of the individual, these reports are a greater intrusion into individual privacy. Thus, the FCRA imposes greater procedural requirements on employers that request and use an investigative consumer report. Following  are the major procedural requirements an employer must comply with under the FCRA.

Notice and Disclosure

Prior to obtaining a report from a consumer reporting agency, an employer must provide the following notice and disclosure to the applicant or employee:

Initial notice and disclosure for a consumer report. Before an employer orders a consumer report, the employer must notify the applicant or employee that it may obtain a consumer report on the individual for employment purposes. This initial notice and disclosure requirement for a consumer report must be made in writing in a separate document containing no other content and must be clear and conspicuous.

Special notice and disclosure for an investigative consumer report. An employer must specially notify an applicant or employee that it may obtain an investigative consumer report on the applicant or employee for employment purposes. The special notice and disclosure for the investigative consumer report must be:

·         Made no later than three days after the employer requests the investigative consumer report.

·         Made in writing.

·         Mailed or delivered to the applicant or employee in clear and accurate language.

·         The notice and disclosure must include the following:

·         A statement that the investigative consumer report may include information about the individual’s character, general reputation, personal characteristics or mode of living.

·         A statement advising the individual of his or her right to make a written request to the employer for a complete and accurate disclosure of the nature and scope of the investigation requested by the employer.

·         A statement that the employer is required to disclose the nature and scope of the investigation to the individual, in writing, within five days after the date the employer receives the individual’s request for disclosure or the date the employer requests the investigative consumer report, whichever is later.

·         A copy of the “summary of consumer rights.”

The FCRA also requires that the consumer reporting agency provide the employer with a copy of the summary of consumer rights at the time the report is furnished to the employer.

Written Consent From
Applicant or Employee

An employer must obtain written consent from the applicant or employee authorizing the employer to order a consumer report or investigative consumer report.

General consent. Before an employer requests a consumer report or an investigative consumer report, the applicant or employee must authorize the employer to obtain the consumer report or investigative consumer report by written consent.

Medical consent.  If the report will include medical information, the applicant or employee must specifically consent to the inclusion of the medical information in the report. This consent must be in writing and must specifically authorize the employer to obtain medical information.

It is unclear under the FCRA whether a new consent or authorization must be obtained each time an employer wants to order a report on the applicant or employee. In 1998, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a nonbinding opinion letter that provided that employers need not “go through the disclosure/authorization process each time a report is requested.” Instead, the employer may “obtain a general or ‘blanket’ authorization from the consumer to obtain consumer reports at any time during the consumer’s tenure of employment.”

Nonetheless, it is recommended that if an employer uses a general consent or authorization form, the employer should make clear that it is a “continuing” consent or authorization. The consent or authorization form should state that it is a continuing consent and will remain valid until the applicant or employee revokes the consent in writing.

Certification of Compliance

Before a consumer reporting agency may provide any information to an employer, the employer must provide initial certification of use and legal compliance. Special certification is required for an investigative consumer report.

Initial Certification of Use and Legal Compliance. An employer must identify itself and certify the use of the report and legal compliance with the FCRA. The certification will require the employer to state the purpose, which must be permissible under the FCRA, for which the employer intends to use the report and to state that the employer:

·         Will not use the report for any other purpose.

·         Provided the required initial notice and disclosure to the applicant or employee.

·         Will provide a copy of the summary of consumer rights to the applicant or employee before taking any adverse action.

·         Will not violate any federal or state equal employment opportunity laws in connection with its use of the report.

If an employer requests a report from a consumer reporting agency for a purpose that is not permitted by the FCRA, but represents to the consumer reporting agency that the report will be used for a permissible purpose, the employer will be civilly liable to both the consumer reporting agency and the individual, and also may be subject to criminal penalties, for obtaining the information under false pretenses.

Special Certification for an Investigative Consumer Report. Before an employer obtains an investigative consumer report, it must make a special certification to the consumer reporting agency, in addition to the above certification of use and legal compliance. This special certification must state that the employer:

·         Has provided the required investigative consumer report special notice and disclosure to the applicant or employee.

·         Will disclose the nature and scope of the investigation to the applicant or employee upon written request no later than five days after the date the employer receives the request or the date the employer first ordered the investigative consumer report, whichever is later.

While it is not clear whether the FCRA permits a general and continuing certification, it is clear that the FCRA imposes greater procedural requirements on the use of investigative consumer reports. Thus, it is recommended that the employer complete a certification each time it orders an investigative consumer report.

What Should the Employer Expect From the Consumer Reporting Agency?

An employer should expect the following when the consumer reporting agency provides the requested consumer report or investigative consumer report to the employer:

·         Summary of consumer rights. The consumer reporting agency must provide a written summary of the consumer’s rights at the time the consumer reporting agency gives the report to the employer.

·         Notice of user responsibilities. The consumer reporting agency must provide the employer with a notice of the employer’s responsibilities as a user of a consumer report or investigative consumer report under the FCRA.

What Procedural Requirements Must an Employer Follow Before Taking Adverse Action?

In addition to the notice, disclosure and certification an employer must make before obtaining a consumer report or investigative consumer report from a consumer reporting agency, an employer must comply with various procedural requirements when it actually uses the information provided in the report. Primarily, an employer must adhere to certain procedures when it takes “adverse action” based on a consumer report or investigative consumer report.

The FCRA defines “adverse action” as a denial of employment or any other decision for employment purposes that adversely affects any current or prospective employee. This definition is extremely broad and could include decisions regarding promotion, demotion, suspension, reassignment, termination or retention of an employee, among other actions.

Disclosure of Report

Before an employer may take adverse action against an applicant or employee that is based in whole or in part on a consumer report or investigative consumer report, it must provide the individual with a copy of the report and a copy of the individual’s summary of consumer rights.

Notice of Adverse Action

When an employer takes an adverse action against an applicant or employee that is based in whole or in part on a consumer report or investigative consumer report, it must provide the individual with notice of the adverse action. This notice may be verbal, written or electronic and must provide:

·         An explanation of the adverse action.

·         The name, address and telephone number of the consumer reporting agency (including the toll-free number for the consumer reporting agency if it operates on a nationwide basis) that provided the report.

·         A statement that the consumer reporting agency did not make the decision to take the adverse action and is unable to provide the individual the specific reasons why the adverse action was taken.

·         A statement that the individual has the right to request a free copy of the report from the consumer reporting agency within 60 days after the individual receives this notice.

·         A statement that the individual has the right to dispute with the consumer reporting agency the accuracy or completeness of any information in the report.

While the FCRA does not require this notice to be in writing, employers are advised to provide written notice anyway.

The report provided to the applicant or employee cannot be redacted in any way to conceal or remove information. For this reason, employers should instruct any third-party agency that conducts background checks to prepare separate reports on each individual. The only report that should be given to an applicant or employee is the report that pertains solely to that person.

The FCRA does not specify how long an employer must wait after making the pre-adverse action disclosure before actually taking adverse action and mailing the post-adverse action disclosure. However, the purpose of the provision is to permit the individual an opportunity to correct any error in the report before adverse action is taken based on the information in the report. Additionally, at least one FTC opinion letter states that a waiting period of five business days was reasonable under the circumstances addressed in that letter. Based on this letter and the purposes of the FCRA, employers should generally wait at least five business days after sending the pre-adverse action disclosure before making an adverse decision and mailing the post-adverse action disclosure form.

Federal regulations also require employers to take appropriate measures to dispose of sensitive information derived from consumer reports.

Are There Exceptions to The FCRA’s Procedural Requirements?

As originally enacted, the FCRA did not contain an exception for investigations of employee misconduct. As a result, the FTC promulgated an interpretation that employers must comply with the FTC’s disclosure and authorization requirements prior to engaging in an investigation of employee misconduct. In response, Congress amended the FCRA in 2003 to address this issue; as a result, the FCRA now contains an exception for “communications … made to an employer in connection with an investigation of (1) suspected misconduct relating to employment; or (2) compliance with Federal, State, or local laws and regulations, the rules of a self-regulatory organization, or any pre-existing written policies of the employer.”

In 2004, Congress amended the FCRA with the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act (FACTA), which further addressed the issue of employee investigations. Specifically, FACTA excludes certain communications relating to investigations of employee misconduct from the definition of a consumer report. Consequently, FACTA amended the FCRA so that the FCRA exempts certain investigations of suspected wrongdoing from its typical notice and disclosure requirements. FACTA still requires that subsequent disclosure to the investigated party may need to be made when the investigation was conducted by a consumer reporting agency. If an adverse action is taken as a result of the investigation of employee misconduct, the employer must make disclosures to the employee. An employer must disclose a summary of the nature and substance of communications related to the investigation of employee misconduct, but it need not disclose its sources of information.

What Are the Penalties For Violating the FCRA?

Employers that are “negligent in failing to comply” with the FCRA’s requirements are liable to a consumer for actual damages, costs of a suit and attorneys’ fees. In addition, if it is determined that an employer is in “willful noncompliance” of the FCRA, the employer may face punitive damages. Furthermore, criminal penalties also may be imposed if a person obtains a credit report under false pretenses. Finally, employers also must be concerned about class-action lawsuits by applicants or employees based on violations of the FCRA.

Due to the inherent risks and potential liability involved in navigating through the confusing regulations of the FCRA, employers are strongly advised to consult with experienced labor counsel before obtaining any consumer reports or taking any adverse actions based on any consumer reports. Employers should therefore analyze their policies to ensure that they are in full compliance with requirements of the FCRA.

Finally, the laws of individual states sometimes impose additional requirements on employers that obtain and use background reports for employment applicants. Because some states impose these additional requirements, employers also should review the law of each state in which they intend to use any consumer reports.

Greg S. Labate is a partner and co-chair of Sheppard Mullin’s Labor and Employment Practice Group, and is based in Orange County, Calif

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Ordering a SSN ID Verification Report

StarPoint Screening’s SSN ID Verifier can be ordered online and returned instantly in PDF format.  View a sample SSN ID Verification Report.

The SSN ID Verifier will automatically verify identity against known matches such as:

• The zip code matches the state.
• The last name matches the address.
• The Social Security Number matches the first and last name.
• The Social Security Number issue date is within a valid date range.
• The Social Security Number is not listed as deceased.
• Option for subject to meet specified age requirements.

The SSN ID Verification Report order form will ask for the following information:

Applicant’s full name – First, Middle and Last
Applicant’s Address
Applicant’s Social Security Number

Questions? Call us at 1-877-330-2444 or Email StarPoint Employment Screening

Ready to Sign-up? Sign-up for Employment Screening Online!

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Ordering a Pre-employment MVR Driving Record

Check the driving record of current and prospective employees by using StarPoint Employment Screening to search DMV records. Our MVR Driver Records Report allows you to search DMV records online to identify driving violations instantly. This is a routine practice among most potential employers.

View a Sample Driving Record

Such a records check will reveal:
• Name
• Violations
• Social Security Number
• Date of Birth
• Date of Death
• Address
• County
• Sex
• Race
• Remarks
• License Expiration Date
• Issue Date
• License Class
• License Status
• License Type
• Hair Color
• Eye Color
• Height
• Weight
• License Number

The MVR Driver Records Report order form will ask for the following :

Applicant’s full name – First, Middle and Last
Applicant’s Address
State of Driver’s License
Driver’s License Number

Questions? Call us at 1-877-330-2444 or Email Us
Ready to Sign-up? Sign-up for Employment Screening Online!

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Ordering a Pre-employment Credit Report

Running an applicant’s credit report can alert you to potential problems before hiring the applicant. Pre-employment Credit reports are a valuable tool for assessing applicants who may occupy a position where business needs dictate a history of financial responsibility. When performing pre-employment screening for positions in financial and retail industries, the credit check is an inexpensive addition to your screening examination.

An employment credit report appears as a soft inquiry and does not affect the applicant’s credit score. You can run an applicant’s credit report and get a PDF returned in seconds.

View Sample Pre employment Credit Report

The Pre-employment Credit Check order form will ask for the following information:

Applicant’s full name – First, Middle and Last
Applicant’s Address
Applican’t Social Security Number
Applicant’s Date of Birth

Questions? Call us at 1-877-330-2444 or Email Us

Ready to Sign-up? Sign-up for Employment Screening Online!

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Ordering a Background Check

Employees are an important asset to your company and vital to the success and well being.  Pre-employment background checks can now be ordered online and returned instantly.  You can run State Criminal Check or a National Criminal Check and get a PDF returned in seconds.

View StarPoint Employment Screening’s National Criminal Coverage Area

The Background Check order form will ask for the following information:

  • Applicant’s full name – First, Middle and Last
  • Applicant’s Date of Birth

NOTE: The middle name is not a required field but in the case of a common name such as John Smith, you would need the middle initial to improve report accuracy and prevent errors from too many matches.

Questions? Call us at 1-877-330-2444 or Email Us
Ready to Sign-up? Sign-up for Employment Screening Online!

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Sign-up for an Employment Screening Account

Conducting pre-employment screening is vital to the success and well-being of any business.  Pre-Employment screening is faster and easier than ever if you use StarPoint Employment Screening.

Here is a checklist of items you need to sign-up for an Employment Screening account with StarPoint Employment Screening.

Your Company Information:
•    Your Company Name
•    Main Contact
•    Address
•    Telephone
•    Email Address
•    Billing Contact
•    Billing Address
•    Billing Email
•    Billing Phone

Questions? Call us at 1-877-330-2444 or Email Us

Ready to Sign-up? Sign-up for Employment Screening Online!

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